What does it say that most of the 10 poorest states are Republican? And MOST of the poorest 20, too.


Jack Cafferty, CNN, asked a very important rhetorical question today: “What does it say that most of the 10 poorest states are Republican?

The Bottom 10/poorest states (per capita earnings per citizen) in the U.S. are:

  • New Mexico (R) #40 out of 50
  • Louisiana (R)
  • South Carolina (R)
  • Montana (R)
  • Tennessee (R) 
  • Oklahoma (R)
  • Alabama (R)
  • Kentucky (R)
  • Arkansas (D)
  • West Virginia (D)
  • Mississippi (R) #50 out of 50

If you were to look at the Bottom 20/poorest states, it only gets worse with Republican states making up16 out of 20.

  • Nebraska (R) #30 out of 50
  • Maine (R)
  • Indiana (R)
  • Ohio (R)
  • Michigan (R)
  • Missouri (D)
  • South Dakota (R)
  • Idaho (R)
  • Florida (R)
  • North Carolina (D) #39 out of 50

I’m not going to make a judgement on this. I have traditionally voted Republican more than 50% of the time, although I often vote for Democrats here in my home state of Virginia — I’m an independent that is actually independent.

Politics are more balanced here in Virginia — we’re neither red nor blue, we’re purple — but I’m not sure that that has anything to do with us being in the Top 10 ‘got it better than the rest’.

Maybe racing to the bottom to eliminate worker protections, benefits, minimum wage, etc., is not the road to being competitive.

Just saying … and just thinking … Jack Cafferty has a point: Democrats seem to be on the defense, but when Republicans ask who will you trust with your future and the economy then why exactly should we trust Republicans if results matter?

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4 Comments

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4 responses to “What does it say that most of the 10 poorest states are Republican? And MOST of the poorest 20, too.

  1. Is there any proof that the two are causally related? Do people with low per capital earnings vote Republican? Do Republican governments create economies with low per capital earnings? There could be any number of other factors.

    • Yes, there could be any number of factors involved.

      However, 16 out of 20 states is not just a statistical standard margin of error. It is a trend that has just one thing in common: these states are Republican-dominated and the laws and regulations are Republican-dominated.

      This trend is not true for the other 30 states that tend to be either balanced in their political mix and choices, or that are largely Democratic.

  2. Laurie

    Just out of curiosity – what are we using to classify states as R/D here?

    Nebraska (R) #30 out of 50
    Maine (R) (Obama won 2008)
    Indiana (R) (Obama won 2008)
    Ohio (R) (Obama won 2008)
    Michigan (R) (Obama won 2008)
    Missouri (D) (McCain won 2008)
    South Dakota (R)
    Idaho (R)
    Florida (R) (Obama won 2008)
    North Carolina (D) #39 out of 50
    New Mexico (Obama won 2008)

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